Architecture

The architect Le Corbusier described New York as a “beautiful catastrophe.” Wander the avenues of Midtown or the tangle of streets in Greenwich Village, and you’ll soon understand his point. Despite the order imposed by the city’s famous grid, a unique chaos characterizes this city and its buildings.

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The architect Le Corbusier described New York as a “beautiful catastrophe.” Wander the avenues of Midtown or the tangle of streets in Greenwich Village, and you’ll soon understand his point. Despite the order imposed by the city’s famous grid, a unique chaos characterizes this city and its buildings.

The architect Le Corbusier described New York as a “beautiful catastrophe.” Wander the avenues of Midtown or the tangle of streets in
Greenwich Village, and you’ll soon understand his point. 

Despite the order imposed by the city’s famous grid, a unique chaos characterizes this city and its buildings. Stately brownstones sit next to 1960s apartment
blocks; an abandoned railroad track has been transformed into the High Line, a urban garden running for twenty blocks, suspended twenty feet about the city streets.

The most famous buildings of New York can be found in any guidebook—the Chrysler Building, the Empire State Building, Grand Central—but our guides will also point out gems that are easily overlooked.

Stops on a walking tour might include a synagogue on the Lower East Side, now lost amid boutiques and bars; the mews houses off of Washington Square Park; and the sole New York building by famed Chicago architect Louis Sullivan, found on an otherwise unremarkable downtown block.

When it comes to New York’s famous landmarks, we’ll provide you with exclusive access you might not have otherwise, beginning with admission to the September 11 Memorial. Our guides will put Frank Lloyd Wright’s only building in New York, the Guggenheim, in the context of its time and draw your attention to details like the tile work in the lobby of the Woolworth Building or a Harry Bertoia screen that sits on the second floor of a Joe Fresh store (there’s a long, onlyin- New-York story behind that screen that our guide will share). 

Our helicopter tours of Manhattan can be literally breathtaking and provide a dazzling perspective on the city’s skyscrapers. With our guides leading you, you’ll leave New York with a new appreciation of the skyline and streetscapes of this beautiful, chaotic, unique metropolis